Approaching Infinity (or at least the speed of light)

April 5th, 2006
infinity.gif
Bandwidth
Storage Space
Processing Power

As these become limitless it changes the way we work with computers. I suppose that’s the premise of Web2.0 (assuming there’s a premise beyond the hype).
The elimination of these three bottlenecks promotes Time-Shifting, Place-Shifting and People-Shifting.

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Web2.0 Apps

April 5th, 2006

Replace Word http://ajaxwrite.com
Replace Excel http://www.irows.com/

AutoStitch

March 30th, 2006

Changing a plethora of photos into a panorama:
http://www.cs.ubc.ca/~mbrown/autostitch/autostitch.html

3.5" Floppy disks

March 24th, 2006
floppy.jpg

Today, I got the following call from my boss:
Boss: At the all-hands meeting today I want you to discuss {big proprietary feature that was just completed}.
Me: I thought {co-worker} was going to discuss that?
Boss: She’s not in today.
Me: Oh. So this is for the meeting in [check clock] 16 minutes?
Boss: Yup. But it doesn’t need a big production, just a quick explaination.

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3.5″ Floppy disks

March 24th, 2006
floppy.jpg

Today, I got the following call from my boss:
Boss: At the all-hands meeting today I want you to discuss {big proprietary feature that was just completed}.
Me: I thought {co-worker} was going to discuss that?
Boss: She’s not in today.
Me: Oh. So this is for the meeting in [check clock] 16 minutes?
Boss: Yup. But it doesn’t need a big production, just a quick explaination.

Read the rest of this entry »

Web 2.0 + Ads

March 24th, 2006

Figuring out how to make readers write all the content and pay for it.

AJAX

March 23rd, 2006

From: http://www.onlamp.com/pub/a/onlamp/2005/06/09/rails_ajax.html
…here’s the history of Ajax in 60 seconds or less.
In the beginning, there was the World Wide Web. Compared with desktop applications, web applications were slow and clunky. People liked web applications anyway because they were conveniently available from anywhere, on any computer that had a browser. Then Microsoft created XMLHttpRequest in Internet Explorer 5, which let browser-side JavaScript communicate with the web server in the background without requiring the browser to display a new web page. That made it possible to develop more fluid and responsive web applications. Mozilla soon implemented XMLHttpRequest in its browsers, as did Apple (in the Safari browser) and Opera.
XMLHttpRequest must have been one of the Web’s best kept secrets. Since its debut in 1998, few sites have used it at all, and most developers, if they even knew about it, never used it. Google started to change that when it released a series of high-profile web applications with sleek new UIs powered by XMLHttpRequest. The most visually impressive of these is Google Maps, which gives you the illusion of being able to drag around an infinitely sizable map in its little map window.
While Google’s prominent use of XMLHttpRequest dramatically demonstrated that vastly improved UIs for web apps were possible, it was Jesse James Garrett’s February 18 essay that finally gave this technique a usable name: Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML).

Behaviour

March 23rd, 2006

Reclaim clean HTML from the burdon of OnClick and other javascript tags.
Behaviour home page